source: branches/3.18-stable/data/units.xml @ 7938

Last change on this file since 7938 was 7346, checked in by Nicklas Nordborg, 4 years ago

Fixes #2080: Add Molar concentration (=Molarity) as a quantity

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1<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
2<!--
3  $Id: units.xml 7346 2017-04-27 06:56:19Z nicklas $
4
5  Copyright (C) 2008 Nicklas Nordborg
6
7  This file is part of BASE - BioArray Software Environment.
8  Available at http://base.thep.lu.se/
9
10  BASE is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
11  modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License
12  as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 3
13  of the License, or (at your option) any later version.
14
15  BASE is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
16  but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
17  MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
18  GNU General Public License for more details.
19
20  You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
21  along with BASE. If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
22-->
23<quantities
24  xmlns="http://base.thep.lu.se/units.xsd"
25  >
26  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.LENGTH">
27    <name>Distance</name>
28    <reference-unit>1 meter</reference-unit>
29    <description>
30      Distance is defined by distance light travels in vacuum during
31      1/299 792 458 of a second. See http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/meter.html
32      and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meter
33    </description>
34    <unit>
35      <name>Kilometer</name>
36      <symbol>km</symbol>
37      <factor>1000</factor>
38      <description>1 kilometer is 1000 meters.</description>
39    </unit>
40    <unit>
41      <name>Meter</name>
42      <symbol>m</symbol>
43      <factor>1</factor>
44      <description>1 meter is the standard unit of distance.</description>
45    </unit>
46    <unit>
47      <name>Centimeter</name>
48      <symbol>cm</symbol>
49      <factor>0.01</factor>
50      <description>1 centimeter is 1/100 of a meter.</description>
51    </unit>
52    <unit>
53      <name>Millimeter</name>
54      <symbol>mm</symbol>
55      <factor>0.001</factor>
56      <description>1 millimeter is 1/1 000 of a meter.</description>
57    </unit>
58    <unit>
59      <name>Micrometer</name>
60      <symbol>µm</symbol>
61      <alias>um</alias>
62      <factor>1E-6</factor>
63      <description>1 micrometer is 1/1 000 of a millimeter.</description>
64    </unit>
65    <unit>
66      <name>Nanometer</name>
67      <symbol>nm</symbol>
68      <factor>1E-9</factor>
69      <description>1 nanometer is 1/1 000 of a micrometer.</description>
70    </unit>
71  </quantity>
72  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.MASS">
73    <name>Mass</name>
74    <reference-unit>1 kilogram</reference-unit>
75    <description>
76      Mass is defined by the kilogram prototype.
77      See http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/kilogram.html and
78      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass
79    </description>
80    <unit>
81      <name>Kilogram</name>
82      <symbol>kg</symbol>
83      <factor>1</factor>
84      <description>1 kilogram is the reference unit of mass.</description>
85    </unit>
86    <unit>
87      <name>Gram</name>
88      <symbol>g</symbol>
89      <factor>1E-3</factor>
90      <description>1 gram is 1/1 000 of a kilogram.</description>
91    </unit>
92    <unit>
93      <name>Milligram</name>
94      <symbol>mg</symbol>
95      <factor>1E-6</factor>
96      <description>1 milligram is 1/1 000 of a gram.</description>
97    </unit>
98    <unit>
99      <name>Microgram</name>
100      <symbol>µg</symbol>
101      <alias>ug</alias>
102      <factor>1E-9</factor>
103      <description>1 mikrogram is 1/1 000 of a milligram.</description>
104    </unit>
105  </quantity> 
106  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.TIME">
107    <name>Time</name>
108    <reference-unit>1 second</reference-unit>
109    <description>
110      Time is defined by the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods of the
111      radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine
112      levels of the ground state of the cesium 133 atom.
113      See http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/second.html and
114      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second
115    </description>
116    <unit>
117      <name>Year</name>
118      <symbol>y</symbol>
119      <alias>year</alias>
120      <alias>years</alias>
121      <factor>31557600</factor>
122      <description>1 year is 365.25 days in average or 31 557 600 seconds.</description>
123    </unit>
124    <unit>
125      <name>Month</name>
126      <symbol>mo</symbol>
127      <alias>month</alias>
128      <alias>months</alias>
129      <factor>2629800</factor>
130      <description>1 month is 30.4375 days in average or 2 629 800 seconds.</description>
131    </unit>
132    <unit>
133      <name>Week</name>
134      <symbol>w</symbol>
135      <alias>week</alias>
136      <alias>weeks</alias>
137      <factor>604800</factor>
138      <description>1 week is 7 days or 604 800 seconds.</description>
139    </unit>
140    <unit>
141      <name>Day</name>
142      <symbol>d</symbol>
143      <alias>day</alias>
144      <alias>days</alias>
145      <factor>86400</factor>
146      <description>1 day is 24 hours or 86 400 seconds.</description>
147    </unit>
148    <unit>
149      <name>Hour</name>
150      <symbol>h</symbol>
151      <alias>hour</alias>
152      <alias>hours</alias>
153      <factor>3600</factor>
154      <description>1 hour is 60 minutes or 3600 seconds.</description>
155    </unit>
156    <unit>
157      <name>Minute</name>
158      <symbol>min</symbol>
159      <alias>minute</alias>
160      <alias>minutes</alias>
161      <factor>60</factor>
162      <description>1 minute is 60 seconds.</description>
163    </unit>
164    <unit>
165      <name>Second</name>
166      <symbol>s</symbol>
167      <alias>sec</alias>
168      <factor>1</factor>
169      <description>1 second is the reference unit of time.</description>
170    </unit>
171    <unit>
172      <name>Millisecond</name>
173      <symbol>ms</symbol>
174      <factor>1E-3</factor>
175      <description>1 millisecond is 1/1 000 of a second.</description>
176    </unit>
177    <unit>
178      <name>Microsecond</name>
179      <symbol>µs</symbol>
180      <alias>ug</alias>
181      <factor>1E-6</factor>
182      <description>1 microsecond is 1/1 000 of a millisecond.</description>
183    </unit>
184    <unit>
185      <name>Nanosecond</name>
186      <symbol>ns</symbol>
187      <factor>1E-9</factor>
188      <description>1 nanosecond is 1/1 000 of a microsecond.</description>
189    </unit>
190  </quantity>
191  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.TEMPERATURE">
192    <name>Temperature</name>
193    <reference-unit>1 kelvin</reference-unit>
194    <description>
195      Temperature is defined as 1/273.16 of the triple point of water.
196      See http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/kelvin.html and
197      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelvin
198    </description>
199    <unit>
200      <name>Kelvin</name>
201      <symbol>K</symbol>
202      <factor>1</factor>
203      <description>Kelvin is the reference unit of temperature.</description>
204    </unit>
205    <unit>
206      <name>Celsius</name>
207      <symbol>°C</symbol>
208      <alias>C</alias>
209      <factor>1</factor>
210      <offset>273.15</offset>
211      <description>
212        The Celcius scale has 0 = freezing point of water
213        and 100 = boiling point of water and is related to Kelvin by an
214        offset of 273.15.
215      </description>
216    </unit>
217    <unit>
218      <name>Fahrenheit</name>
219      <symbol>°F</symbol>
220      <alias>F</alias>
221      <factor>0.55555555555555555555555555555556</factor>
222      <offset>255.3722</offset>
223      <description>
224        In the Fahrenheit scale the water freezes as 32 degrees
225        and boils at 212.
226      </description>
227    </unit>
228  </quantity>
229  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.CURRENT">
230    <name>Electric current</name>
231    <reference-unit>1 ampere</reference-unit>
232    <description>
233      The ampere is that constant current which, if maintained in two straight parallel
234      conductors of infinite length, of negligible circular cross section, and placed 1
235      meter apart in vacuum, would produce between these conductors a force equal to 2 × 10-7
236      newton per meter of length. See http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/ampere.html and
237      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampere
238    </description>
239    <unit>
240      <name>Ampere</name>
241      <symbol>A</symbol>
242      <factor>1</factor>
243      <description>1 ampere is the reference unit of electric current.</description>
244    </unit>
245    <unit>
246      <name>Milliampere</name>
247      <symbol>mA</symbol>
248      <factor>1E-3</factor>
249      <description>1 milliampere is 1/1 000 of an ampere.</description>
250    </unit>
251    <unit>
252      <name>Microampere</name>
253      <symbol>µA</symbol>
254      <alias>uA</alias>
255      <factor>1E-6</factor>
256      <description>1 microampere is 1/1 000 of a milliampere.</description>
257    </unit>
258    <unit>
259      <name>Nanoampere</name>
260      <symbol>nA</symbol>
261      <factor>1E-9</factor>
262      <description>1 nanoampere is 1/1 000 of a microampere.</description>
263    </unit>
264  </quantity>
265  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.SUBSTANCE">
266    <name>Amount of substance</name>
267    <reference-unit>1 mol</reference-unit>
268    <description>
269      The mole is the amount of substance of a system which contains as many elementary
270      entities as there are atoms in 0.012 kilogram of carbon 12. See
271      http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/mole.html and
272      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mole_(unit)
273    </description>
274    <unit>
275      <name>Kilomole</name>
276      <symbol>kmol</symbol>
277      <factor>1000</factor>
278      <description>1 kilomole is 1000 moles.</description>
279    </unit>
280    <unit>
281      <name>Mole</name>
282      <symbol>mol</symbol>
283      <factor>1</factor>
284      <description>1 mole is the reference unit of amount of substance.</description>
285    </unit>
286    <unit>
287      <name>Millimole</name>
288      <symbol>mmol</symbol>
289      <factor>1E-3</factor>
290      <description>1 millimole is 1/1 000 of a mole.</description>
291    </unit>
292    <unit>
293      <name>Micromole</name>
294      <symbol>µmol</symbol>
295      <factor>1E-6</factor>
296      <description>1 micromole is 1/1 000 of a millimole.</description>
297    </unit>
298    <unit>
299      <name>Nanomole</name>
300      <symbol>nmol</symbol>
301      <factor>1E-9</factor>
302      <description>1 nanomole is 1/1 000 of a micromole.</description>
303    </unit>
304  </quantity>
305  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.AREA">
306    <name>Area</name>
307    <reference-unit>1 m²</reference-unit>
308    <description>
309      1 square meter is defined as the area of a square whose sides measure exactly one metre.
310      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area
311    </description>
312    <unit>
313      <name>Square kilometer</name>
314      <symbol>km²</symbol>
315      <alias>km2</alias>
316      <factor>1E6</factor>
317      <description>1 square kilometer is 1 000 000 square meters.</description>
318    </unit>
319    <unit>
320      <name>Square meter</name>
321      <symbol></symbol>
322      <alias>m2</alias>
323      <factor>1</factor>
324      <description>1 square meter is the reference unit of area.</description>
325    </unit>
326    <unit>
327      <name>Square centimeter</name>
328      <symbol>cm²</symbol>
329      <alias>cm2</alias>
330      <factor>1E-4</factor>
331      <description>1 square centimeter is 1/10 000 of a square meter.</description>
332    </unit>
333    <unit>
334      <name>Square millimeter</name>
335      <symbol>mm²</symbol>
336      <alias>mm2</alias>
337      <factor>1E-6</factor>
338      <description>1 square millimeter is 1/1 000 000 of a square meter.</description>
339    </unit>
340    <unit>
341      <name>Square micrometer</name>
342      <symbol>µm²</symbol>
343      <alias>um2</alias>
344      <factor>1E-12</factor>
345      <description>1 square microimeter is 1/1 000 000 of a square millimeter.</description>
346    </unit>
347  </quantity>
348  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.VOLUME">
349    <name>Volume</name>
350    <reference-unit>1 m³</reference-unit>
351    <description>
352      1 cubic meter is the volume a cube whose sides measure exactly 1 meter.
353      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volume
354    </description>
355    <unit>
356      <name>Cubic meter</name>
357      <symbol></symbol>
358      <alias>m3</alias>
359      <factor>1</factor>
360      <description>1 cubic meter is the reference unit of volume.</description>
361    </unit>
362    <unit>
363      <name>Liter</name>
364      <symbol>l</symbol>
365      <factor>1E-3</factor>
366      <description>1 liter is the 1/1 000 of a cubic meter.</description>
367    </unit>
368    <unit>
369      <name>Milliliter</name>
370      <symbol>ml</symbol>
371      <alias>cm³</alias>
372      <alias>cm3</alias>
373      <factor>1E-6</factor>
374      <description>
375        1 milliliter is 1/1 000 of a liter. A milliliter is equal
376        to 1 cm³.
377      </description>
378    </unit>
379    <unit>
380      <name>Microliter</name>
381      <symbol>µl</symbol>
382      <alias>mm³</alias>
383      <alias>mm3</alias>
384      <factor>1E-9</factor>
385      <description>
386        1 microliter is 1/1 000 of a milliliter. A microliter is
387        equal to 1 mm³.
388      </description>
389    </unit>
390    <unit>
391      <name>Nanoliter</name>
392      <symbol>nl</symbol>
393      <factor>1E-12</factor>
394      <description>1 nanoliter is 1/1 000 of a microliter.</description>
395    </unit>
396    <unit>
397      <name>Picoliter</name>
398      <symbol>pl</symbol>
399      <factor>1E-15</factor>
400      <description>1 picoliter is 1/1 000 of a nanoliter.</description>
401    </unit>
402  </quantity>
403  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.VELOCITY">
404    <name>Velocity</name>
405    <reference-unit>1 m/s</reference-unit>
406    <description>
407      The volocity is the distance traveled during a specified unit of time.
408      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed
409    </description>
410    <unit>
411      <name>Meter per second</name>
412      <symbol>m/s</symbol>
413      <factor>1</factor>
414      <description>1 m/s is the reference unit of velocity.</description>
415    </unit>
416    <unit>
417      <name>Kilometers per hour</name>
418      <symbol>km/h</symbol>
419      <alias>km/hour</alias>
420      <factor>3.6</factor>
421      <description>1 m/s is the same as 3.6 km/hour.</description>
422    </unit>
423  </quantity>
424  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.ANGLE">
425    <name>Angle</name>
426    <reference-unit>1 radian</reference-unit>
427    <description>
428      One radian is the angle subtended at the center of a circle by an arc that
429      is equal in length to the radius of the circle. See
430      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radian
431    </description>
432    <unit>
433      <name>Radian</name>
434      <symbol>rad</symbol>
435      <factor>1</factor>
436      <description>1 radian is the reference unit of angle.</description>
437    </unit>
438    <unit>
439      <name>Degree</name>
440      <symbol>°</symbol>
441      <alias>deg</alias>
442      <factor>0.017453292519943295</factor>
443      <description>1 degree is π/180 radians (≈0.0175).</description>
444    </unit>
445    <unit>
446      <name>Minute (angle)</name>
447      <symbol>'</symbol>
448      <factor>2.908882086657216E-4</factor>
449      <description>1' = 1/60°</description>
450    </unit>
451    <unit>
452      <name>Second (angle)</name>
453      <symbol>"</symbol>
454      <factor>4.84813681109536E-6</factor>
455      <description>1" = 1/60' = 1/3 600°</description>
456    </unit>
457  </quantity>
458  <quantity system-id="net.sf.based.core.Quantity.FORCE">
459    <name>Force</name>
460    <reference-unit>1 newton</reference-unit>
461    <description>
462      A force is what causes a mass to accelerate. 1 newton is the force required
463      to give a mass of one kilogram an acceleration of one meter per second
464      squared. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton
465    </description>
466    <unit>
467      <name>Kilonewton</name>
468      <symbol>kN</symbol>
469      <factor>1000</factor>
470      <description>1 kilonewton is 1 000 N.</description>
471    </unit>
472    <unit>
473      <name>Newton</name>
474      <symbol>N</symbol>
475      <factor>1</factor>
476      <description>1 newton is the reference unit of force.</description>
477    </unit>
478    <unit>
479      <name>Millinewton</name>
480      <symbol>mN</symbol>
481      <factor>1E-3</factor>
482      <description>1 millinewton is 1/1 000 N.</description>
483    </unit>
484    <unit>
485      <name>Micronewton</name>
486      <symbol>µN</symbol>
487      <factor>1E-6</factor>
488      <description>1 micronewton is 1/1 000 mN.</description>
489    </unit>
490  </quantity>
491  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.FREQUENCY">
492    <name>Frequency</name>
493    <reference-unit>1 hertz</reference-unit>
494    <description>
495      The definition of hertz follows directly from the definition of
496      a second such that the hyperfine splitting in the ground state of the
497      caesium 133 atom is exactly 9 192 631 770 hertz.
498      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hertz
499    </description>
500    <unit>
501      <name>Hertz</name>
502      <symbol>Hz</symbol>
503      <factor>1</factor>
504      <description>1 hertz is the reference unit of frequency.</description>
505    </unit>
506    <unit>
507      <name>Kilohertz</name>
508      <symbol>kHz</symbol>
509      <factor>1000</factor>
510      <description>1 kilohertz is 1 000 hertz.</description>
511    </unit>
512    <unit>
513      <name>Megahertz</name>
514      <symbol>MHz</symbol>
515      <factor>1E6</factor>
516      <description>1 megahertz is 1 000 000 hertz.</description>
517    </unit>
518    <unit>
519      <name>Gigahertz</name>
520      <symbol>GHz</symbol>
521      <factor>1E9</factor>
522      <description>1 gigahertz is 1 000 000 000 hertz.</description>
523    </unit>
524    <unit>
525      <name>Terahertz</name>
526      <symbol>THz</symbol>
527      <factor>1E12</factor>
528      <description>1 terahertz is 1 000 gigahertz.</description>
529    </unit>
530  </quantity>
531
532  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.DENSITY">
533    <name>Density</name>
534    <reference-unit>1 kg/m³</reference-unit>
535    <description>
536      The density of a material is the mass per unit volumne. See
537      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Density
538    </description>
539    <unit>
540      <name>Grams per cubic centimeter</name>
541      <symbol>g/cm³</symbol>
542      <alias>g/cm3</alias>
543      <alias>g/mL</alias>
544      <factor>1000</factor>
545      <description>
546        1 g/cm³ is the is the same as 1 g/mL and is 1 000 kilograms per
547        cubic metre.
548      </description>
549    </unit>
550    <unit>
551      <name>Kilograms per cubic meter</name>
552      <symbol>kg/m³</symbol>
553      <alias>kg/m3</alias>
554      <alias>g/L</alias>
555      <factor>1</factor>
556      <description>
557        1 kg/m³ is the reference unit of density.
558      </description>
559    </unit>
560    <unit>
561      <name>Nanograms per microliter</name>
562      <symbol>ng/µl</symbol>
563      <alias>ng/ul</alias>
564      <factor>0.001</factor>
565      <description>
566        1 ng/µl is the the same as 1 gram per cubic metre.
567      </description>
568    </unit>
569  </quantity>
570  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.ENERGY">
571    <name>Energy</name>
572    <reference-unit>1 joule</reference-unit>
573    <description>
574      One joule is the work done, or energy expended, by a force of one newton moving one
575      meter along the direction of the force. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joule
576    </description>
577    <unit>
578      <name>Kilowatt hour</name>
579      <symbol>kWh</symbol>
580      <factor>3.6E6</factor>
581      <description>1 kilowatt hour is 3 600 000 joules.</description>
582    </unit>
583    <unit>
584      <name>Megajoule</name>
585      <symbol>MJ</symbol>
586      <factor>1E6</factor>
587      <description>1 megajoule is 1 000 000 joules.</description>
588    </unit>
589    <unit>
590      <name>Kilojoule</name>
591      <symbol>kJ</symbol>
592      <factor>1E3</factor>
593      <description>1 kilojoule is 1 000 joules.</description>
594    </unit>
595    <unit>
596      <name>Joule</name>
597      <symbol>J</symbol>
598      <alias>Ws</alias>
599      <factor>1</factor>
600      <description>
601        1 joule is the reference unit of energy. A joule is also
602        equal to one watt-second (Ws)
603      </description>
604    </unit>
605    <unit>
606      <name>Millijoule</name>
607      <symbol>mJ</symbol>
608      <factor>1E-3</factor>
609      <description>1 millijoule is 1/1 000 of a joule.</description>
610    </unit>
611    <unit>
612      <name>Mikrojoule</name>
613      <symbol>µJ</symbol>
614      <factor>1E-6</factor>
615      <description>1 microjoule is 1/1 000 of a millijoule.</description>
616    </unit>
617    <unit>
618      <name>Megaelectronvolt</name>
619      <symbol>MeV</symbol>
620      <factor>1.60217653E-12</factor>
621      <description>
622        1 kiloelectronvolt is 1 000 000 electronvolts.
623      </description>
624    </unit>
625    <unit>
626      <name>Kiloelectronvolt</name>
627      <symbol>keV</symbol>
628      <factor>1.60217653E-15</factor>
629      <description>
630        1 kiloelectronvolt is 1 000 electronvolts.
631      </description>
632    </unit>
633    <unit>
634      <name>Electronvolt</name>
635      <symbol>eV</symbol>
636      <factor>1.60217653E-19</factor>
637      <description>
638        1 electronvolt is the amount of kinetic energy gained by a single unbound electron
639        when it passes through an electrostatic potential difference of one volt, in vacuum.
640        1 eV ≈ 1.602 176 53E−19 J.
641      </description>
642    </unit>
643  </quantity>
644  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.POWER">
645    <name>Power</name>
646    <reference-unit>1 watt</reference-unit>
647    <description>
648      Power measures the rate of energy conversion. The reference unit
649      is 1 watt which is equal to 1 joule of energy per second.
650      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watt
651    </description>
652    <unit>
653      <name>Megawatt</name>
654      <symbol>MW</symbol>
655      <alias>MJ/s</alias>
656      <factor>1E6</factor>
657      <description>1 megawatt is 1 000 000 watts.</description>
658    </unit>
659    <unit>
660      <name>Kilowatt</name>
661      <symbol>kW</symbol>
662      <alias>kJ/s</alias>
663      <factor>1000</factor>
664      <description>1 kilowatt is 1 000 watts.</description>
665    </unit>
666    <unit>
667      <name>Watt</name>
668      <symbol>W</symbol>
669      <alias>J/s</alias>
670      <factor>1.0</factor>
671      <description>1 watt is the reference unit of power.</description>
672    </unit>
673    <unit>
674      <name>Milliwatt</name>
675      <symbol>mW</symbol>
676      <alias>mJ/s</alias>
677      <factor>1E-3</factor>
678      <description>1 milliwatt is 1/1 000 watt.</description>
679    </unit>
680    <unit>
681      <name>Microwatt</name>
682      <symbol>µW</symbol>
683      <alias>uW</alias>
684      <alias>µJ/s</alias>
685      <factor>1E-3</factor>
686      <description>1 microwatt is 1/1 000 milliwatt.</description>
687    </unit>
688  </quantity>
689  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.PRESSURE">
690    <name>Pressure</name>
691    <reference-unit>1 pascal</reference-unit>
692    <description>
693      Pressure is a measure of perpendicular force per unit area i.e. equivalent
694      to one newton per square meter. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pascal_(unit)
695    </description>
696    <unit>
697      <name>Megapascal</name>
698      <symbol>MPa</symbol>
699      <alias>MN/m²</alias>
700      <alias>MN/m2</alias>
701      <factor>1E6</factor>
702      <description>1 megapascal is 1 000 000 Pa.</description>
703    </unit>
704    <unit>
705      <name>Kilopascal</name>
706      <symbol>kPa</symbol>
707      <alias>kN/m²</alias>
708      <alias>kN/m2</alias>
709      <factor>1000</factor>
710      <description>1 kilopascal is 1 000 Pa.</description>
711    </unit>
712    <unit>
713      <name>Pascal</name>
714      <symbol>Pa</symbol>
715      <alias>N/m²</alias>
716      <alias>N/m2</alias>
717      <factor>1.0</factor>
718      <description>1 pascal is the reference unit of pressure.</description>
719    </unit>
720    <unit>
721      <name>Millipascal</name>
722      <symbol>mPa</symbol>
723      <alias>mN/m²</alias>
724      <alias>mN/m2</alias>
725      <factor>1E-3</factor>
726      <description>1 millipascal is 1/1 000 of a pascal.</description>
727    </unit>
728    <unit>
729      <name>Micropascal</name>
730      <symbol>µPa</symbol>
731      <alias>uPa</alias>
732      <alias>µN/m²</alias>
733      <alias>uN/m2</alias>
734      <factor>1E-6</factor>
735      <description>1 micropascal is 1/1 000 of a millipascal.</description>
736    </unit>
737  </quantity>
738  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.POTENTIAL">
739    <name>Electric potential</name>
740    <reference-unit>1 volt</reference-unit>
741    <description>
742      The volt is defined as the potential difference across a conductor
743      when a current of one ampere dissipates one watt of power. See
744      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volt
745    </description>
746    <unit>
747      <name>Kilovolt</name>
748      <symbol>kV</symbol>
749      <factor>1000</factor>
750      <description>1 kilovolt is 1 000 volts.</description>
751    </unit>
752    <unit>
753      <name>Volt</name>
754      <symbol>V</symbol>
755      <factor>1</factor>
756      <description>1 volt is the reference unit of electrical potential.</description>
757    </unit>
758    <unit>
759      <name>Millivolt</name>
760      <symbol>mV</symbol>
761      <factor>1E-3</factor>
762      <description>1 millivolt is 1/1 000 of a volt.</description>
763    </unit>
764    <unit>
765      <name>Microvolt</name>
766      <symbol>µV</symbol>
767      <alias>uV</alias>
768      <factor>1E-6</factor>
769      <description>1 microvolt is 1/1 000 of a millivolt.</description>
770    </unit>
771  </quantity>
772  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.RESISTANCE">
773    <name>Electric resistance</name>
774    <reference-unit>1 ohm</reference-unit>
775    <description>
776      The ohm is the electric resistance between two points of a conductor when
777      a constant potential difference of 1 volt, applied to these points, produces
778      in the conductor a current of 1 ampere.
779      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohm
780    </description>
781    <unit>
782      <name>Megaohm</name>
783      <symbol>MΩ</symbol>
784      <alias>MO</alias>
785      <factor>1E6</factor>
786      <description>1 megaohm is 1 000 000 ohms.</description>
787    </unit>
788    <unit>
789      <name>Kiloohm</name>
790      <symbol>kΩ</symbol>
791      <alias>kO</alias>
792      <factor>1000</factor>
793      <description>1 kiloohm is 1 000 ohms.</description>
794    </unit>
795    <unit>
796      <name>Ohm</name>
797      <symbol></symbol>
798      <alias>O</alias>
799      <factor>1</factor>
800      <description>1 ohm is the reference unit of electrical resistance.</description>
801    </unit>
802    <unit>
803      <name>Milliohm</name>
804      <symbol>mΩ</symbol>
805      <alias>mO</alias>
806      <factor>1E-3</factor>
807      <description>1 milliohm is 1/1 000 ohm.</description>
808    </unit>
809  </quantity>
810  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.CHARGE">
811    <name>Electrical charge</name>
812    <reference-unit>1 coulomb</reference-unit>
813    <description>
814      1 coulomb is the amount of electric charge transported by a current of 1 ampere in 1 second.
815      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coulomb
816    </description>
817    <unit>
818      <name>Ampere-hour</name>
819      <symbol>Ah</symbol>
820      <factor>3600</factor>
821      <description>1 ampere-hour is 3 600 coulombs.</description>
822    </unit>
823    <unit>
824      <name>Kilocoulomb</name>
825      <symbol>kC</symbol>
826      <alias>kAs</alias>
827      <factor>1000</factor>
828      <description>1 kilocoulomb is 1 000 coulombs.</description>
829    </unit>
830    <unit>
831      <name>Coulomb</name>
832      <symbol>C</symbol>
833      <alias>As</alias>
834      <factor>1</factor>
835      <description>1 coulomb is the reference unit of charge.</description>
836    </unit>
837    <unit>
838      <name>Millicoulomb</name>
839      <symbol>mC</symbol>
840      <alias>mAs</alias>
841      <factor>1E-3</factor>
842      <description>1 millicoulomb is 1/1 000 of a coulomb.</description>
843    </unit>
844    <unit>
845      <name>Microoulomb</name>
846      <symbol>µC</symbol>
847      <alias>uC</alias>
848      <alias>µAs</alias>
849      <alias>uAs</alias>
850      <factor>1E-6</factor>
851      <description>1 microcoulomb is 1/1 000 of a millicoulomb.</description>
852    </unit>
853    <unit>
854      <name>Nanooulomb</name>
855      <symbol>nC</symbol>
856      <alias>nAs</alias>
857      <factor>1E-9</factor>
858      <description>1 nanocoulomb is 1/1 000 of a microcoulomb.</description>
859    </unit>
860  </quantity>
861  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.CAPACITANCE">
862    <name>Capacitance</name>
863    <reference-unit>1 farad</reference-unit>
864    <description>
865      One farad is the capacitance for which a potential difference of one volt results in
866      a static charge of one coulomb.
867    </description>
868    <unit>
869      <name>Farad</name>
870      <symbol>F</symbol>
871      <factor>1</factor>
872      <description>1 farad is the reference unit of capacitance.</description>
873    </unit>
874    <unit>
875      <name>Millifarad</name>
876      <symbol>mF</symbol>
877      <factor>1E-3</factor>
878      <description>1 millifarad is 1/1 000 of a farad.</description>
879    </unit>
880    <unit>
881      <name>Microfarad</name>
882      <symbol>µF</symbol>
883      <alias>uF</alias>
884      <factor>1E-6</factor>
885      <description>1 microfarad is 1/1 000 of a millifarad.</description>
886    </unit>
887    <unit>
888      <name>Nanofarad</name>
889      <symbol>nF</symbol>
890      <factor>1E-9</factor>
891      <description>1 nanofarad is 1/1 000 of a microfarad.</description>
892    </unit>
893    <unit>
894      <name>Picofarad</name>
895      <symbol>pF</symbol>
896      <factor>1E-12</factor>
897      <description>1 picofarad is 1/1 000 of a nanofarad.</description>
898    </unit>
899  </quantity>
900  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.MAGNETIC_FIELD">
901    <name>Magnetic field</name>
902    <reference-unit>1 tesla</reference-unit>
903    <description>
904      One tesla is equal to one weber per square meter. See
905      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_(unit)
906    </description>
907    <unit>
908      <name>Tesla</name>
909      <symbol>T</symbol>
910      <factor>1</factor>
911      <description>1 tesla is the reference unit of magnetic field.</description>
912    </unit>
913    <unit>
914      <name>Millitesla</name>
915      <symbol>mT</symbol>
916      <factor>1E-3</factor>
917      <description>1 millitesla is 1/1 000 of a tesla.</description>
918    </unit>
919    <unit>
920      <name>Microtesla</name>
921      <symbol>µT</symbol>
922      <alias>uT</alias>
923      <factor>1E-6</factor>
924      <description>1 microtesla is 1/1 000 of a millitesla.</description>
925    </unit>
926    <unit>
927      <name>Nanotesla</name>
928      <symbol>nT</symbol>
929      <factor>1E-9</factor>
930      <description>1 nanotesla is 1/1 000 of a microtesla.</description>
931    </unit>
932  </quantity>
933  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.MAGNETIC_FLUX">
934    <name>Magnetic flux</name>
935    <reference-unit>1 weber</reference-unit>
936    <description>
937      One weber is the magnetic flux which, linking a circuit of one turn, would produce
938      in it an electromotive force of 1 volt if it were reduced to zero at a uniform rate in 1 second.
939      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weber_(unit)
940    </description>
941    <unit>
942      <name>Weber</name>
943      <symbol>Wb</symbol>
944      <factor>1</factor>
945      <description>1 weber is the reference unit of magnetic flux.</description>
946    </unit>
947    <unit>
948      <name>Milliweber</name>
949      <symbol>mWb</symbol>
950      <factor>1E-3</factor>
951      <description>1 milliweber is 1/1 000 of a weber.</description>
952    </unit>
953    <unit>
954      <name>Microweber</name>
955      <symbol>µWb</symbol>
956      <alias>uWb</alias>
957      <factor>1E-6</factor>
958      <description>1 microweber is 1/1 000 of a milliweber.</description>
959    </unit>
960    <unit>
961      <name>Nanoweber</name>
962      <symbol>nWb</symbol>
963      <factor>1E-9</factor>
964      <description>1 nanoweber is 1/1 000 of a microweber.</description>
965    </unit>
966  </quantity>
967  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.ABSORBED_DOSE">
968    <name>Dose (absorbed)</name>
969    <reference-unit>1 gray</reference-unit>
970    <description>
971      One gray is the absorption of one joule of radiation energy by one kilogram of matter.
972      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gray_(unit) and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absorbed_dose
973    </description>
974    <unit>
975      <name>Gray</name>
976      <symbol>Gy</symbol>
977      <factor>1</factor>
978      <description>1 gray is the reference unit of absorbed dose.</description>
979    </unit>
980    <unit>
981      <name>Milligray</name>
982      <symbol>mGy</symbol>
983      <factor>1E-3</factor>
984      <description>1 milligray is 1/1 000 of a gray.</description>
985    </unit>
986    <unit>
987      <name>Microgray</name>
988      <symbol>µGy</symbol>
989      <alias>uGy</alias>
990      <factor>1E-6</factor>
991      <description>1 microgray is 1/1 000 of a milligray.</description>
992    </unit>
993  </quantity>
994  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.EQUIVALENT_DOSE">
995    <name>Dose (equivalent)</name>
996    <reference-unit>1 sievert</reference-unit>
997    <description>
998      The equivalent dose attempts to reflect the biological effects of radiation as
999      opposed to the physical aspects, which are characterised by the absorbed dose.
1000      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sievert and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effective_dose
1001    </description>
1002    <unit>
1003      <name>Sievert</name>
1004      <symbol>Sv</symbol>
1005      <factor>1</factor>
1006      <description>1 sievert is the reference unit of equivalent dose.</description>
1007    </unit>
1008    <unit>
1009      <name>Millisievert</name>
1010      <symbol>mSv</symbol>
1011      <factor>1E-3</factor>
1012      <description>1 millisievert is 1/1 000 of a sievert.</description>
1013    </unit>
1014    <unit>
1015      <name>Microsievert</name>
1016      <symbol>µSv</symbol>
1017      <alias>uSv</alias>
1018      <factor>1E-6</factor>
1019      <description>1 microsievert is 1/1 000 of a millisievert.</description>
1020    </unit>
1021  </quantity>
1022  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.RADIOACTIVITY">
1023    <name>Radioactivity</name>
1024    <reference-unit>1 becquerel</reference-unit>
1025    <description>
1026      1 Bq is defined as the activity of a quantity of radioactive material in
1027      which one nucleus decays per second. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Becquerel
1028    </description>
1029    <unit>
1030      <name>Becquerel</name>
1031      <symbol>Bq</symbol>
1032      <factor>1</factor>
1033      <description>1 becquerel is the reference unit of radioactivity.</description>
1034    </unit>
1035    <unit>
1036      <name>Kilobecquerel</name>
1037      <symbol>kBq</symbol>
1038      <factor>1000</factor>
1039      <description>1 kilobecquerel is 1 000 becquerels.</description>
1040    </unit>
1041    <unit>
1042      <name>Megabecquerel</name>
1043      <symbol>MBq</symbol>
1044      <factor>1E6</factor>
1045      <description>1 megabecquerel is 1 000 000 becquerels.</description>
1046    </unit>
1047    <unit>
1048      <name>Gigabecquerel</name>
1049      <symbol>GBq</symbol>
1050      <factor>1E9</factor>
1051      <description>1 gigabecquerel is 1 000 000 000 becquerels.</description>
1052    </unit>
1053  </quantity>
1054  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.FRACTION">
1055    <name>Fraction</name>
1056    <reference-unit>1</reference-unit>
1057    <description>
1058      Fractions are used to denote relative proportions in
1059      any measured quantity. A fraction is always dimensionless.
1060      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parts-per_notation
1061    </description>
1062    <unit>
1063      <name>Percent</name>
1064      <symbol>%</symbol>
1065      <factor>0.01</factor>
1066      <description>1 percent is 1/100 of the whole.</description>
1067    </unit>
1068    <unit>
1069      <name>Permille</name>
1070      <symbol></symbol>
1071      <factor>0.001</factor>
1072      <description>1 permille is 1/1 000 of the whole.</description>
1073    </unit>
1074    <unit>
1075      <name>Part-per-million</name>
1076      <symbol>ppm</symbol>
1077      <factor>1E-6</factor>
1078      <description>1 part-per-million is 1/1 000 000 of the whole.</description>
1079    </unit>
1080  </quantity>
1081  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.ACCELERATION">
1082    <name>Acceleration</name>
1083    <reference-unit>1 m/s²</reference-unit>
1084    <description>
1085      Acceleration is the increase (or decrease) of speed per unit of time.
1086      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acceleration
1087    </description>
1088    <unit>
1089      <name>Meters per second squared</name>
1090      <symbol>m/s²</symbol>
1091      <alias>m/s2</alias>
1092      <factor>1</factor>
1093      <description>1 meter per second squared is the reference unit of acceleration.</description>
1094    </unit>
1095  </quantity>
1096  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.TORQUE">
1097    <name>Torque</name>
1098    <reference-unit>1 Nm</reference-unit>
1099    <description>
1100      A torque is a pseudo-vector that measures the tendency of a force to rotate
1101      an object about some axis.
1102      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque
1103    </description>
1104    <unit>
1105      <name>Kilonewtonmeter</name>
1106      <symbol>kNm</symbol>
1107      <factor>1000</factor>
1108      <description>1 kilonewtonmeter is 1 000 newtonmeters.</description>
1109    </unit>
1110    <unit>
1111      <name>Newtonmeter</name>
1112      <symbol>Nm</symbol>
1113      <factor>1</factor>
1114      <description>1 newtonmeter is the reference unit of torque.</description>
1115    </unit>
1116    <unit>
1117      <name>Millinewtonmeter</name>
1118      <symbol>mNm</symbol>
1119      <factor>1E-3</factor>
1120      <description>1 millinewtonmeter is 1/1 000 of a newtonmeter.</description>
1121    </unit>
1122    <unit>
1123      <name>Micronewtonmeter</name>
1124      <symbol>µNm</symbol>
1125      <alias>uMn</alias>
1126      <factor>1E-6</factor>
1127      <description>1 micronewtonmeter is 1/1 000 of a millinewtonmeter.</description>
1128    </unit>
1129  </quantity>
1130  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.MOMENTUM">
1131    <name>Momentum</name>
1132    <reference-unit>1 kg·m/s</reference-unit>
1133    <description>
1134      In classical mechanics, momentum is the product of the mass and velocity of an object.
1135      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Momentum
1136    </description>
1137    <unit>
1138      <name>Kilogram-meter per second</name>
1139      <symbol>kgm/s</symbol>
1140      <alias>Ns</alias>
1141      <factor>1</factor>
1142      <description>1 kilogram-meter per second is the reference unit of momentum.</description>
1143    </unit>
1144  </quantity>
1145  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.FLOW_RATE">
1146    <name>Flow rate</name>
1147    <reference-unit>1 m³/s</reference-unit>
1148    <description>
1149      The flow rate is the volume that passes through a given surface per unit
1150      of time. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volumetric_flow_rate
1151    </description>
1152    <unit>
1153      <name>Cubic meter per second</name>
1154      <symbol>m³/s</symbol>
1155      <alias>m3/s</alias>
1156      <factor>1</factor>
1157      <description>1 cubic meter per second is the reference unit of flow rate.</description>
1158    </unit>
1159    <unit>
1160      <name>Liter per second</name>
1161      <symbol>L/s</symbol>
1162      <factor>1E-3</factor>
1163      <description>1 liter per second is 1/1 000 of a cubic meter per second.</description>
1164    </unit>
1165    <unit>
1166      <name>Milliliter per second</name>
1167      <symbol>mL/s</symbol>
1168      <alias>cm³/s</alias>
1169      <alias>cm3/s</alias>
1170      <factor>1E-6</factor>
1171      <description>1 milliliter per second is 1/1 000 of a liter per second.</description>
1172    </unit>
1173    <unit>
1174      <name>Microliter per second</name>
1175      <symbol>µL/s</symbol>
1176      <alias>uL/s</alias>
1177      <alias>mm³/s</alias>
1178      <alias>mm3/s</alias>
1179      <factor>1E-9</factor>
1180      <description>1 milliliter per second is 1/1 000 of a liter per second.</description>
1181    </unit>
1182  </quantity>
1183  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.THERMAL_CONDUCTIVITY">
1184    <name>Thermal conductivity</name>
1185    <reference-unit>1 W/(m·K)</reference-unit>
1186    <description>
1187      Thermal conductivity is the property of a material that indicates its ability
1188      to conduct heat. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_conductivity.
1189    </description>
1190    <unit>
1191      <name>Watt per meter and Kelvin</name>
1192      <symbol>W/m·K</symbol>
1193      <alias>W/m K</alias>
1194      <factor>1</factor>
1195      <description>1 watt per meter and Kelvin is the reference unit of thermal conductivity.</description>
1196    </unit>
1197  </quantity>
1198  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.STORAGE_SIZE">
1199    <name>Storage size</name>
1200    <reference-unit>1 byte</reference-unit>
1201    <description>
1202      A byte is the basic unit of for measuring storage
1203      requirements for files, etc. We use the binary meaning
1204      of the prefixes kilo (k), mega (M) and giga (G). Eg. 1
1205      kilobyte = 1 024 bytes.
1206    </description>
1207    <unit>
1208      <name>Byte</name>
1209      <symbol>B</symbol>
1210      <alias>bytes</alias>
1211      <factor>1</factor>
1212      <description>1 byte is the reference unit of file size.</description>
1213    </unit>
1214    <unit>
1215      <name>Kilobyte</name>
1216      <symbol>kB</symbol>
1217      <factor>1024</factor>
1218      <description>1 kilobyte is 1 024 bytes.</description>
1219    </unit>
1220    <unit>
1221      <name>Megabyte</name>
1222      <symbol>MB</symbol>
1223      <factor>1048576</factor>
1224      <description>1 megabyte is 1 048 576 bytes.</description>
1225    </unit>
1226    <unit>
1227      <name>Gigabyte</name>
1228      <symbol>GB</symbol>
1229      <factor>1073741824</factor>
1230      <description>1 gigabyte is 1 073 741 824 bytes.</description>
1231    </unit>
1232  </quantity>
1233
1234  <quantity system-id="net.sf.basedb.core.Quantity.MOLAR_CONCENTRATION">
1235    <name>Molar concentration</name>
1236    <reference-unit>1 M</reference-unit>
1237    <description>
1238      Molar concentration is defined as the amount of substance (in moles) per liter.
1239      See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molar_concentration
1240    </description>
1241    <unit>
1242      <name>Molar</name>
1243      <symbol>M</symbol>
1244      <factor>1</factor>
1245      <description>1 molar is the references unit of molar concentration</description>
1246    </unit>
1247    <unit>
1248      <name>Millimolar</name>
1249      <symbol>mM</symbol>
1250      <factor>0.001</factor>
1251      <description>1 millimolar is 1/1 000 molar.</description>
1252    </unit>
1253    <unit>
1254      <name>Micromolar</name>
1255      <symbol>µM</symbol>
1256      <alias>uM</alias>
1257      <factor>1E-6</factor>
1258      <description>1 micromolar is 1/1 000 millimolar.</description>
1259    </unit>
1260    <unit>
1261      <name>Nanomolar</name>
1262      <symbol>nM</symbol>
1263      <factor>1E-9</factor>
1264      <description>1 nanomolar is 1/1 000 micromolar.</description>
1265    </unit>
1266    <unit>
1267      <name>Picomolar</name>
1268      <symbol>pM</symbol>
1269      <factor>1E-12</factor>
1270      <description>1 picomolar is 1/1 000 nanomolar.</description>
1271    </unit>
1272  </quantity>
1273
1274<!--
1275  <quantity system-id="">
1276    <name></name>
1277    <reference-unit></reference-unit>
1278    <description>
1279    </description>
1280    <unit>
1281      <name></name>
1282      <symbol></symbol>
1283      <factor></factor>
1284      <description></description>
1285    </unit>
1286  </quantity>
1287-->
1288</quantities>
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